THE INDISCREET LETTER Click here to read book online free

THE INDISCREET LETTER Click here to read book online free 

Read book online free THE INDISCREET LETTER

Click here to read book online free THE INDISCREET LETTER

Click to read book online free THE INDISCREET LETTER

      by

      ELEANOR HALLOWELL ABBOTT

      Author of _Molly Make Believe_, _The Sick-A-Bed Lady_, etc. , etc. 

      New YorkThe Century Co. 

      1915

      THE INDISCREET LETTER

      The Railroad Journey was very long and slow. The Traveling Salesmanwas rather short and quick. And the Young Electrician who lolledacross the car aisle was neither one length nor another, but mostinordinately flexible, like a suit of chain armor. 


THE INDISCREET LETTER Click here to read book online free 

Read book online free THE INDISCREET LETTER


Click to read book online free THE INDISCREET LETTER

ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ Read book online free

ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ Read book online free

Read book online free ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ

Click here to read book online free One Hundred Years of Solitude 

Click to read book online free ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ TRANSLATED FROM THE SPANISH

      ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE Chapter 1 MANY YEARS LATER as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buenda was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice. At that time Macondo was a village of twenty adobe houses, built on the bank of a river of clear water that ran along a bed of polished stones, which were white and enormous, like prehistoric eggs. The world was so recent that many things lacked names, and in order to indicate them it was necessary to point. Every year during the month of March a family of ragged gypsies would set up their tents near the village, and with a great uproar of pipes and kettledrums they would display new inventions. First they brought the magnet. A heavy gypsy with an untamed beard and sparrow hands, who introduced himself as Melquades, put on a bold public demonstration of what he himself called the eighth wonder of the learned alchemists of Macedonia. He went from house to house dragging two metal ingots and everybody was amazed to see pots, pans, tongs, and braziers tumble down from their places and beams creak from the desperation of nails and screws trying to emerge, and even objects that had been lost for a long time appeared from where they had been searched for most and went dragging along in turbulent confusion behind Melquades' magical irons. "Things have a life of their own, " the gypsy proclaimed with a harsh accent. "It's simply a matter of waking up their souls. " Jos Arcadio Buenda, whose unbridled imagination always went beyond the genius of nature and even beyond miracles and magic, thought that it would be possible to make use of that useless invention to extract gold from the bowels

ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ Read book online free

Read book online free ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ


Click to read book online free ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ TRANSLATED FROM THE SPANISH

Read book online free The Two Towers J. R. R. Tolkien

Read book online free The Two Towers J. R. R. Tolkien

The Two Towers J. R. R. Tolkien read book online free

Click here to read book online free The Two Towers J. R. R. Tolkien

Click to read book online free The Two Towers J. R. R. Tolkien

      
Book III

      Chapter 1THE DEPARTURE OF BOROMIR

      Aragorn sped on up the hill. Every now and again he bent to the ground. Hobbits go light, and their footprints are not easy even for a Ranger to read, but not far from the top a spring crossed the path, and in the wet earth he saw what he was seeking. I read the signs aright, he said to himself. Frodo ran to the hill-top. I wonder what he saw there? But he returned by the same way, and went down the hill again. Aragorn hesitated. He desired to go to the high seat himself, hoping to see there something that would guide him in his perplexities; but time was pressing. Suddenly he leaped forward, and ran to the summit, across the great flag-stones, and up the steps. Then sitting in the high seat he looked out. But the sun seemed darkened, and the world dim and remote. He turned from the North back again to North, and saw nothing save the distant hills, unless it were that far away he could see again a great bird like an eagle high in the air, descending slowly in wide circles down towards the earth. Even as he gazed his quick ears caught sounds in the woodlands below, on the west side of the River. He stiffened. There were cries, and among them, to his horror, he could distinguish the harsh voices of Orcs. Then suddenly with a


Read book online free The Two Towers J. R. R. Tolkien

The Two Towers J. R. R. Tolkien read book online free


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Memoirs of a Geisha read book online free

Memoirs of a Geisha read book online free

Click here to read book online free  Memoirs Of A Geisha 

Click to read book online free  Memoirs Of A Geisha 

Memoirs Of A Geisha Arthur Golden Chapter one Suppose that you and I were sitting in a quiet room overlooking a garden, chatting and sipping at our cups of green tea while we talked J about something that had happened a long while ago, and I said to you, "That afternoon when I met so-and-so . . . Was the very best afternoon of my life, and also the very worst afternoon. " I expect you might put down your teacup and say, "Well, now, which was it? Was it the best or the worst? Because it can't possibly have been both!" Ordinarily I'd have to laugh at myself and agree with you. But the truth is that the afternoon when I met Mr. Tanaka Ichiro really was the best and the worst of my life. He seemed so fascinating to me, even the fish smell on his hands was a kind of perfume. If I had never known him, I'm sure I would not have become a geisha. I wasn't born and raised to be a Kyoto geisha. I wasn't even born in Kyoto. I'm a fisherman's daughter from a little town called Yoroido on the Sea of Japan. In all my life've never told more than a handful of people anything at all about Yoroido, or about the house in which I grew up, or about my mother and father, or my older sister-and certainly not about how I became a geisha, or what it was like to be one. Most people would much rather carry on with their fantasies that my mother and grandmother were geisha, and that I began my training in dance when I was weaned from the breast, and so on. As a matter of fact, one day many years ago I was pouring a cup of sake for a man who happened to mention that he had been in Yoroido only the previous week. Well, I felt as a bird must feel when it has flown across the ocean and comes upon a creature that knows its nest. I was so shocked I couldn't stop myself from saying: "Yoroido! Why, that's where I grew up!" This poor man! His face went through the most remarkable series of changes. He tried his best to smile,

Memoirs of a Geisha read book online free


Click to read book online free  Memoirs Of A Geisha 

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